Big Ben, The World Famous Clock To Go Silent For 5-Years

Big Ben, The World Famous Clock To Go Silent For 5-Years
Big Ben, The World Famous Clock To Go Silent For 5-Years

Big Ben, The World Famous Clock To Go Silent For 5-Years

Big Ben, the world famous clock located in Elizabeth Tower in the UK will go silent until 2021 while it undergoes repairs.

The tower, which was last renovated about 30 years ago, is in dire need of repairs.

Officials say it will have to stay silent while repairs go on as its chiming will damage the repairmen’s ears.

According to BBC, while the repair work is ongoing, an electric motor will drive the clock hands, so it will continue to tell the time.

Big Ben’s famous chimes will fall silent from next week until 2021 to allow essential repair works to take place.

The bongs will sound for the final time at midday on Monday before being disconnected to allow the clock and surrounding tower to be restored.

The Great Bell has sounded on the hour for 157 years.

It last fell silent in 2007 and before that, for major refurbishments between 1983 and 1985.

Parliamentary authorities said stopping Big Ben – the commonly used name for the Palace of Westminster’s Elizabeth Tower – would protect workers carrying out the repairs.

It will still sound for important events including New Year’s Eve and Remembrance Sunday.

The clock’s keeper, Steve Jaggs, said Big Ben falling silent was a “significant milestone” in the project to restore the tower.

“This essential programme of works will safeguard the clock on a long term basis, as well as protecting and preserving its home – the Elizabeth Tower,” he added.

NBC News reports that the repairs will cost £29m.

The bell will still sound for important events – New Year’s Eve, and the likes, but will quit chiming on the hour as it usually does.

Big Ben last fell silent in 2007, and before that, for major repairs between 1983 and 1985.

It is expected to chime for the final time midday on Monday, after which repair work will begin in full.

The clock’s keeper Steve Jaggs told BBC”This essential programme of works will safeguard the clock on a long term basis, as well as protecting and preserving its home – the Elizabeth Tower.”

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